ESSENTIALS: Jeff’s “Primary” Spring Outfit

April 4, 2011




Yellow rain jacket ($99) by The North Face, small; Navy “KC” hat ($42) by Baldwin Denim, 7 1/2; Wellington rain boots (eBay, sale $33) by Hunter, size 10; striped tee ($39) by American Apparel, small; packable down sweater/jacket (sale $140) by Patagonia, small; “The Henley” ($198) by Baldwin Denim, size 28.

I like primary colors, a lot.

BOOTS & TEE: I dig my Hunter rainboots and striped tee, but you already knew that.
JACKETS: I generally ask for an obnoxious color when it comes to footwear and outerwear. What’s great is that both of these items are packable, so I can throw these in my Filson tote at a moment’s notice.

Friday Wrap-Up: End of March

April 1, 2011
Friday Wrap-Up: Posts that you may have missed this work that are worth checking out.

In other news…
When Will asks, we deliver.
It’s just that simple: Friday Presentations, (April) fools.

Jeff: “Slim Jim” dry coat black denim (Standard Style, winter sale $75) by Nudie Jeans, size 31×34; Salmon OCBD (Country Club Plaza, $69) by American Apparel, size small; mustard suede shoes (Nordstrom, winter sale $44) by 1901, size 11; grey charcoal blazer (Halls, sale $220) by Billtornade, small.

Seth: brown woven and tasseled loafers (thrifted, $6) by Giorgio Brutini, size 8; Nantucket “Davis”slim chino (Wicker Park, $68) by Club Monaco, size 29×32; White OCBD ($60) by J.Crew, slim small; Madras spring tie by J.Crew.

Photos by Oliver Drambour. Get on back to Chi soon, son.

Thrifty Thursday: ex-roomate’s dad’s friend’s briefcase

March 31, 2011

In college, I lived all over East Campus in Columbia:

  • Sophomore Year: 1323 Anthony Street Apt. A, B & C
    Statistics: 11 guys, one house, three floors and a dog—a Boxer named Anfernee.
    Highlights include: Throwing bottle rockets under the bathroom door while someone was taking a dump, the summer Seth Putnam came to live with us from the wretched JBU, and having the bright idea of creating an “Orphanage” where we put two bunk beds and a single bed, totaling five people in the one room with AC over the summer.
  • Junior Year at 1403 University Avenue Apt B
    Statistics: 2.5 guys, one floor and a big-ass porch.
    Highlights include: Killing a blood-sucking bat with a wiffle bat, drinking beer each M/W/F before my 19th Century American Women’s Poetry taught by an Emily Dickinson scholar, and my roommate assuring me that vodka would heal a rash.
  • Senior Year at 516 S. William Apt A & B
    Statistics: Five guys, one house and an attic.
    Highlights include: Dance parties with strobe lights, chain-smoking on the porch into the wee hours of the night while working on my senior thesis, and deciding that I never wanted to leave East Campus to graduate.

When you’re moving around from house to house and roommate to roommate, your clothing, accessories and belongings all get mixed up, thrown away or just generally disappear. But if you’re lucky, your roommates will just give you things when they are moving out. That’s what happened with the briefcase.

My roommate told me, “Hell, kid, I’m not going to be using this.”
Well, I used it.
And I did use it for a job interview.
And that job, I was offered.
And that job offer, I accepted.
Thanks, EK.
“The Stockton” navy blazer (Standard Style, $199) by Shades of Grey by Micah Cohen, small; white oxford (retail, $69) by American Apparel, small; Wallabees (Cargo Largo, $40) by Clarks, size 11; destroyed khakis (Halls winter sale, $68) by Gant by Michael Bastian, size 29×34; ex-roommate’s dad’s friend’s briefcase (Elliot, free); throw-away of black sunglasses I stole from Seth (Seth’s note: Finally. Getting some respect around here.); grey wool tie (URBN, $9.99) by BDG.

Photography by Seth Putnam.

Tools of the trade

March 31, 2011
Leather journal, thrifted sportcoat, J.Crew button-down, Saddleback briefcase, thrifted Giorgio Bruttini loafers and Corona portable typewriter from the mid to late 1920s.

Some of these items are called into action daily. That blazer fits me almost as well as if it had been tailored…one of the best coats I’ve owned, and a steal at $6. The elbow pads actually serve a utilitarian purpose for all the days I’m hunched over my desk. When the coat finally craps out on me, I’ll take it apart and see if I can’t make a pattern from it.

The kind of writing I do (mainly the electronic, 21st century kind) may not be best accomplished on a manual typewriter. But it helps to have one around, if only for the inspiration. Same reason I’ve got pictures of some of these guys (hi-ya, Faulkner) hung around my office. And every so often, I light up my pipe, pour a glass of scotch and thwack the 90-year-old keys to get some thoughts in ink on paper.

The typewriter was going to be a July birthday present for my then-girlfriend, also a writer. I was spending the summer as a reporter in sweltering Mississippi, where the heat is so heavy the lakes become hottubs by the end of June.

I hunted for the damn thing for weeks, finally finding it in a junk shop deep in plantation country. The owner—an old, penny-pinching, Southern fella—was reluctant to part with it and asked for about twice what it was worth. We ended up making a deal we were both unhappy with, which I suppose is the sign of a good trade.

I took it back to the antebellum house where I was living and spent a few hours cleaning it up, oiling it, making it maybe worth what the old fella initially wanted for it. Summer ended, and the word-machine came with me to a big-city newspaper where I covered politics. Now, I’m in Chicago—an even bigger city with different stories—and I’ve still got that old typewriter.

Photography by Jeff Kieslich

midweSTYLE: Old Watertower, Chicago

March 30, 2011

Seth and I went looking for a suit with our friend Oliver, who’s visiting from Kansas City. We talked about life and love and happiness—ya know, much like the rest of us who are meandering through this twenty-something phase trying to find purpose. You would think finding a slim-fitting suit would be an easy task. However, we’re trying to find one that isn’t going to break the bank. Student loans and entry-level jobs don’t help the situation, but you need a suit for the interview, son.

ABOUT THE LOOKS:
Oliver is decked out in all J.Crew except the 1901 saddle shoes by Nordstrom.

But, why ALL J.Crew?
Because J.Crew provides menswear apparel that is affordable, accessible and good-looking. That, and his house burned down a few months ago, forcing him to start his wardrobe over from scratch. J.Crew has played a large part in nailing the essentials.

It’s still cold as hell (that doesn’t make sense) in Chicago even as we are nearing the end of March. I wanted to be warm but still have some compartments to carry my wallet, keys, chapstick and iPhone.

But can’t you just carry those items in your pants like a normal person, Jeff?
You think I can fit a dime in this size 28 selvedge denim, let alone a wallet? Please.

To keep warm, I decided to rock the Patagonia Down Sweater under my thrifted J.Crew utility jacket. A little pop of red under my utility jacket—you know I dig it.

Jeff (left): Khaki utility jacket (thrifted, $6.99) by J.Crew, extra-small; down sweater (retail, sale $150) by Patagonia, small; green and white striped oxford (eBay, $20) by Gitman Bros Vintage; “The Henley” dry selvedge 14-ounce ‘Karabo’ fabric (Standard Style, $198) by Baldwin Denim, size 28; blue and green repp crest tie (thrifted, $1); cheap sunglasses I found in my car one day stole from Seth; blue suede bucks (Nordstrom, sale $44) by 1901.

Oliver (right): Grey utility shirt, small slim; wool University coat, small; Timex vintage field army watch; plaited blue cardigan, medium; Oxbow madras spring tie; 484 raw slim selvedge denim—all by J.Crew. Clubmaster sunglasses by Rayban; “Saddle Up” oxfords (Nordstrom, $99) by 1901, size 9.5.

Photography by Seth Putnam.

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