Out of season & in my price range.

January 23, 2014

Shopping out of season has it perks. Sure, you can’t buy it now and wear it now. But good things come to those who wait and such, or at least that’s what I chose to follow when I was in Los Angeles last year. I made my annual stop at Opening Ceremony to snatch up all the discarded and left for the dead items that denizens of Los Angeles decided weren’t good for them that winter. I mean, you live in L.A. why would you own anything but bikinis, crop-tops and jellies, right?

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Beautiful leather, great color and rather comfortable. It was a style that I wasn’t sure how to wear, but managed to pull them off by placing my pants completely over them and at times, yes at times, I’ll do a slight back tuck so the front part just shows. It’s a look, but hey I’ll give it a try until Seth disapproves. More importantly, I scored these leather jodhpur boots for 75% off, which made cheaper than a pair of selvedge denim. Worth it, man.

INTRODUCING: THE COLLECTIVE QUARTERLY

January 13, 2014

Collective Quarterly — Issue Ø: Marfa from Collective Quarterly on Vimeo.

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I’d like to introduce you to what I’ve been working on for the past year of my life: The Collective Quarterly. Simply put, it’s a lifestyle print magazine that journeys to one city per issue and reveals how art and goods are made there. We meet characters on the ground and tell their stories, but we also take our own team and watch them create unique products. In our first issue, we went to Marfa, Texas, where we slept in teepees in the desert, met a saloon keeper with an eyepatch, and almost got stuck overnight in Mexico. Every page is also fully scannable with your smartphone. So, if you see something you like, we’ve made it very easy to obtain. But it’s more than a magazine; it’s an attempt to connect with cities and people who are living well. One thing I carry with me throughout my projects is the worry that the real message will be missed—that people will be distracted by the clothes, or the booze, or the food—and miss the larger point: that all of these things, while delightful, are mediums for human connection. In Marfa, we found the inspiration to make some products you may be interested in. Pre-orders are now available, so if you like what you see, be the first to snag these while they last.

blanket

Faribault Woolen Mill x Collective Quarterly “Marfa” Blanket

backpack

Faribault Woolen Mill x Duluth Pack “Scoutmaster” Laptop Bag

bracelet

Collective Quarterly “Marfa” Turquoise BraceletvestFaribault Woolen Mill x Fischer Clothing Vest

One last thing I should say: I wouldn’t have found myself involved in this project if it weren’t for the Midwestyle. Through some stroke of good luck, my partners Jesse Lenz and Jay Gullion came across this site and liked it. Eventually we began talking via Instagram, they decided that I’d be a bearable fit for the magazine. And for that, I’m forever grateful.

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In Favor Of: The Quilted Sweater

December 11, 2013

I’m a big fan of the quilted sweater, whether it’s a crew-neck pullover or a shawl collar cardigan. If you’re looking for something that’s a little different than your traditional staples, head this way. It’s accessible and shows you’re open to a little detail. Props to Club Monaco for making a quality, comfortable and affordable on-trend piece that’s not so over the top.

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Cardigan ($130) and sweatshirt ($100) by Club Monaco

What I Can’t Take Off: Denim—and Life After It

November 21, 2013

5EE41390-9CAB-4C6B-BB97-75B0FEA920FFIs there one thing (or three) in your closet that you keep going back to once the weather gets cold? Throughout all of fall and part of winter, that’s usually denim for me. That’s certainly the case this year, but are two other items that I haven’t been able to quit wearing.

  1. The first is an ultra-comfy terrycloth sweatshirt from life/after/denim’s line last year. Sadly, it’s gone from the lineup this year—although this one is similar)—but this year they’ve got an Iroquois cardigan that looks badass. (Between the two options, I dig the heather navy pattern.) Part of it’s even made out of yak.
  2. The second is this Faribault x Ebbets Field ballcap, which was given to me by my friend John Mooty from Faribault Woolen Mill (who supplied the wool for this bad boy). And I’m not even a hat guy. Or I wasn’t before this season.

Ball cap by Faribault x Ebbets Field; terrycloth sweatshirt by life/after/denim; “Suck it, Trebek” T-shirt; “Stanton” 14.5-oz selvage jeans by Rogue Territory; natural leather belt by Cause + Effect; “Desert Trek” shoes by Clarks Originals.

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Midwestyle’s Favorite Outerwear

November 13, 2013

If you’re anything like us, whether your city got snow yesterday or you’re excited to finally wear your winter coat, you’re itching to dig out the heaviest jacket you own. But before we close the book on autumn entirely, we realized that we’ve got a few old fall favorites that have been treating us well this year. Which made us curious: What’s one of your favorite pieces of outerwear that you look forward to wearing each year?

Here are some of ours.

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Seth: I ain’t got no shame, so I’ll admit it: When Jeff was still living in Chicago, and because I didn’t start off as the most adventurous wearer of clothes, I often jacked his style—even right down to seeing something new that he’d purchased and thinking “Ooh, I guess I could pull that off,” and having him pick up another one for me. That’s exactly what happened with this field jacket, which cost a mere 30 bones on sale. And just like Jeff, it has never led me astray. It’s what I always reach for when the wind picks up in the second half of the year. It’s got pockets galore. And the reinforced shooting shoulder reminds me of being back on the farm in Missouri with my trusted 20-gauge over-and-under. Field jacket by Levi’s.

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David: I picked up this “Skiff” jacket earlier this season because I’m a sucker for wool. But having worked through a few less satisfying coat purchases, I knew exactly what I was looking for this time around. After having spent the end of summer trying to justify much more expensive options, this snap-front, fitted-but-not-too-fitted lil’ getup came into my life. It wasn’t cheap, but I’ve made enough mistakes in my life (clothing related and not) to feel good about fall-ing (get it?!) for a new go-to. With this, this, and this already in my closet, lord knows another navy blue jacket better be pretty close to perfect. I never loved my double-breasted peacoat, and anything with a collar that won’t stand up and cover my neck is going to be disappointing. So far the Skiff jacket has been very satisfying. The cut is slim enough that layering requires some creativity, but it’s totally worth it. Skiff jacket by Wallace & Barnes x J.Crew.

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Garrett: Call me a purist; call me a traditionalist; call me boring. When it comes to my favorite piece of outerwear, my go-to is my Spiewak Dugan peacoat. This thing is as throwback British navy as you can get. I picked this baby up three years ago for $6 at Urban Outfitters. Yes, $6. Sale + sale + discount = magic. The reason this is my favorite piece is because of it’s versatility. I’ve rocked this with wingtips and a suit as well as my destroyed denim and some NB’s. It’s tight like a tiger but hugs my curves in all the right ways. It keeps me warm on cold nights and when those Chicago winds pick up, the collar goes up as well. It’s a staple in my winter lineup, and I don’t see that changing anytime soon. Wool peacoat by Spiewak.

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Jeff: The ideal shape and texture for a leather motorcycle jacket for me is a little shorter than usual and a little rigid. I found this bad boy in either Kansas City or Chicago—I honestly don’t remember but I know that I paid under $20 for it because…it’s already had some mileage on it with the paint brush. A paint brush you say? Take a closer look and you’ll see dancing skeletons and flames on it. Yeah, I bought it to paint over it but never ended up doing it. Whatever, man. They grew on me. Vintage leather jacket, maker unknown.

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Joe: I snagged this fella on sale last year, and it has easily become my most prized possession. The wool-cashmere blend is incredibly soft and warm, perfect for wintertime weather. Typically, a topcoat is worn over a suit as a dressier option for outerwear. However, given my obsession with it, I wear it very casually too (collar popped, of course). This year I want the same coat in navy and gray. Too much, you might ask? Maybe. But I’m doing it anyway. “Ludlow” topcoat by J.Crew.

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Chris: I recall when I was a young lad, and the big box lords of clothing deemed me “husky.” My parents fought hard to get me in a pair of jeans, however I vowed to wear nothing but sweatpants the rest of my life because of their forgiving fit. Then came that one day (of many) my mom took me shopping at our local Salvation Army. I will never forget my favorite purchase: a Levis denim jacket. I littered that thing with my favorite patches and buttons: TMNT, White Sox, Bears, Korn.

I’ve been on the prowl for a trimmer denim jacket ever since. During one of my late-night drunk Etsy searches, I came across the perfect item: “Vintage Levi’s denim jacket, size 34.” One week later, I received it in the mail, and it has proven to be the most versatile piece in my wardrobe. I know it’s true “vintage” because I did my homework. It doesn’t have lower hand pockets; it has single row stitching; and I have the Big E red tab with two pockets and vertical pleats on the front. I wear this layered under sport jackets and layer it over sweaters, vests, and ties. Denim jacket by Levi’s.

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Jonathan: I picked up this “slick” coat back in June, via the annual Steven Alan sample sale. Don’t remember what I paid for it, but all I can remember was, “Hey, SALE!” (Hands over credit card.) Although I couldn’t wear it as soon as I got it—which is always a bit deflating—I haven’t taken it off since the weather turned. Technically a rain slicker with a detachable hood, I’ve found it roomy enough to throw a sweatshirt + denim jacket underneath with ease (and for this I’m a fan…’cause options.) Slicker by Steven Alan.

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Cameron: Being the layer-er that I am, I’m not one for “coats” per se, which is why this Isaora down pullover has been so clutch for me when the temperature drops. I know, I know – I look like the Michelin Man, or an astronaut, or a guy who took a bunch of old bike tires and sewed them into a sweatshirt. I get it, the thing’s weird. It’s also deceivingly warm and stands well on its own, though often times I throw something on over it – be it a denim jacket, an oversized cardigan, or a zip-up fleece. While that final layering piece helps, it’s the pullover that’s doing the heavy lifting in terms of keeping me warm. I grabbed this guy on sale last winter from Isaora’s website and haven’t looked back. Down pullover by Isaora.


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