Friday Wrap-Up: October 21

A splendid week is ahead of us up in Chicago. It’ll be a weekend of pumpkin-patching, porched-in-beer-drinking and shenanigans around the city.
  • Also: Seth and I got invited to gab about #menswear and #blogging by the rad people of Laundry Magazine at the Grow Here Workshop. We’d love to see you there!

Here’s a batch of things that I’ve been enjoying lately.

Noteworthy:
If you’re in the Midwest, drink that beer.
If you’ve got Hulu or DVR, watch that show.
If you’re in Barnes & Noble, buy that magazine.
If you get dragged into Anthropologie by your girlfriend, buy that candle. (I go willingly, whatevs.)
Links Abound:
What’s happening in the style commune:
eBay Snapshot

lampshaj - I’ve got nothing against a fine crew neck sweater, but 150.00 for a 80-20 cotton without any form of credentials or character? Horse shit!

Chris - Bob’s 47. YES! Just watched first season of The Walking Dead. Amazing. Your blog. Ridiculous!

Blake - Got to admit I’m pretty stoked about Mylo Xyloto myself. Just ensure you give your lady and boss fair warning that you might be AWOL for the next week or so due to repeated musical orgasms.

http://21stcenturygent.blogspot.com/

midweSTYLE: On the MKT Trail

We live in a day and age where our lives our dominated by choices. We wake up, decide where to get our coffee, what to eat for lunch, what to watch on TV, where to get our haircut, etc. When it comes to denim, we’re blessed with luxury of a few dozen purchase-worthy brands. Take your pick: Baldwin, Rogue Territory, Tellason, Left Field, A.P.C., Kicking Mule Workshop, Imogene + Willie, Apolis and so on and so forth. It’s a little crazy to think that when we turn back the clock a few decades, this vast sea of quality constructed jeans is reduced to just one stand-out brand. I think you know where I’m going with this. Levi Strauss and Co. has been the king of denim since they started churning out their signature 501′s at the turn of the 20th century. And there’s no garment more iconic in the gritty subcultures of America than the Trucker jacket. Just because we live our lives in the indigo of a new brand doesn’t mean we have to forget who invented the wheel.

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These black 501s were my Dad’s. They’re some of my favorite jeans in terms of fit. They’re a straight leg that’s slim through the thigh and they have a higher rise that sits at my hips. That is, of course, where pants are supposed to sit. Not that a low rise is bad. It’s just a little less natural, in terms of your body’s dimensions. Your legs begin at your hips. Conversely, that’s where your torso ends. Dropping the rise means that we’re visually elongating our torso, thus shortening the appearance of our legs. For some, that’s the desired effect. Other times, it can look goofy. It’s a subtle thing, but hey, life is in the details.

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Something about a black tie makes a man feel alive. Not to mention, a man’s best accessory is always his facial hair. Or if you don’t have any, I guess your best accessory is your awesome personality, or something like that.

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Levi’s branding is spot on. And it looks even better after a few decades of wear and tear. The jacket was an eBay acquisition. Note: half of my closet is comprised of eBay acquisitions. Also, the presence of white tube socks denotes #swag.

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On Cameron: vintage Trucker jacket by Levi’s; heather hoody by American Apparel; vintage white OCBD by Gant; black tie by J.Crew; black leather belt (stolen from dad); old black 501s (stolen from dad) by Levi’s; military watch by Timex for J.Crew; black PTBs by Florsheim Imperial.

Photography by Mallory Wiegers.

Keith - Ditto. When I realized that Cameron was the writer and the model…*drool*

Now I can stalk midwestyle via Twitter!

Azalea - Yes, Cameron is a cutie…sayeth a straight Midwestern mama.

Cameron - @Tyson – I hear that. Best bet is to try and find one at a thrift store and just try it on. You don’t have to get that one, necessarily. Just use it to find fit. Or, generally if you wear a small, go for a 36 or 38, medium – 40 or 42, large 44 and up.

Tyson - I’ve wanted to hunt for a trucker jacket on eBay, but I don’t know that my jacket size. That probably sounds stupid, but I’m not sure how to figure out if a jacket fits without trying it on.

Raquel - Your layering is perfect. And the black tie looks so classic.. really great choice.

sosaygoodbye - Cameron is the most adorable. So sayeth one of your homosexual readers.

Christina - Bought a pair of Levis at the store on Michigan Ave. They are skinny. I have had them since senior year of college (4 plus years). They are still amazing. And they cost $50.

I Art Fashion - Vintage denim is the best.
Great look & post

http://iartfashion.blogspot.com/

midweSTYLE: Desert tones

Lately, I’ve been into this website called, “The Color Collective.” I’ve been reading this blog for a little over a year. It’s a huge source of inspiration in my presentation. Essentially, it’s a simple blog with various runway images, fashion photography, illustrations and landscapes all neatly complemented with highlighted colors from the image.
I usually like what I wear to reflect a mood, a theme, a story, a tone. The Color Collective picks those ideas out and translates them to workable color stories. Give it a try. I did with this post. Granted, most of the images are of women, but let’s get over that and source their inspiration, shall we?

From behind, it’s a field jacket, grey jeans and desert boots. From the front, it’s a scoop-neck, slub-knit tee and a draping open cardigan. A neat contrast from different angles. This is another one of my go-to outfits for this fall. It’s relaxed but not boring.

My thrifted, dirty canvas and leather backpack has come a long way from undergrad, especially for being such a great three dollar find my sophomore year in Kansas City. It’s a very understated, cool backpack: nothing fancy, minimal padding, no laptop sleeve. It’s like a broken in baseball glove after a couple of seasons. Trusty and well-loved.
Also, swap out your laces on your desert boots. It’s refreshing.
Second also, can we talk about grey denim? It’s the best.

Finally pulled the trigger on this puppy, the Giles & Brother brass railroad spike bracelet. I hate the word “man jewelry,” so I’m just going to pretend that we’re all secure enough in our own genders that we don’t need to put an extra adjective in front to assert that, cool? Haha. It’s “men’s jewelry” if anything, not man jewelry. I’ll step off my soap box, now. HAPPY MONDAY!

On Jeff: Cotton hunting jacket by Levi’s; unixex silk/rayon blend scoop-neck tee by T by Alexander Wang; slate-colored cardigan; grey straight-leg “Kane” 5-pocket pant courtesy J Brand; brown desert boots by Clark’s; grey interchangeable boot laces from J.Crew; brass railroad spike bracelet by Giles & Brother.

Photos by Seth Putnam.

stetson5 - is this the giles & bro skinny or normal railroad cuff?

lampshaj - Looks great. What would you guys consider the most versatile color for the desert boot? Thanks

Amy Creyer - Oh hai thar. That’s my favorite alley to shoot street style in, you’ll see that background in a lot of my shots :)

Color Collective - um, WOW this is awesome!!! love the outfit and the colors! thanks so much for the mention, how flattering! :)

Azalea - Love the warm, fall colors.

Friday Wrap-Up: Homecoming Edition

Despite our trickery in the past, we will really be tearing things up here this weekend. Bonus. So, in honor of Mizzou’s 100th Homecoming this weekend (and hence the 100th Homecoming ever, since, you know, Mizzou invented it), a photo from our archives:

Enjoy your weekend. We know we will.

Around the interwebz:

  • The folks over at Fossil created a rad graphic and featured us on their blog. (Fossil)
  • Ryan shoots a little mixer at Connect featuring Outlier. [You_Have_Broken_The_Internet]
  • It’s cooling down. We definitely want to throw this on our mattresses on the floor beds. (Pendleton)
  • Great new winter gear over at Need Supply, Wharf, Apolis and Steven Alan.
  • Put This On gives their weekly eBay round-up. Stock up on some well-loved gear that needs a good home! (Put This On)
  • Really nice belts for a really nice price. (Well-Spent)
  • What’s neater than toddlers and selvedge denim? Toddlers in selvedge denim. (Baldwin Denim)

Raquel - perfect collegiate apparel guys. Hope you had fun at homecoming!

Blake - Congrats on the shout-out by Fossil, guys! Much deserved.

http://21stcenturygent.blogspot.com/

THE REPERTOIRE: Working Lunch

This is the second installment of the “tiny cookbook” Blake Royer (from The Paupered Chef) is producing for us. If you’re just joining us: The idea was born over drinks at a tucked-away Chicago bar with the idea that, in addition to knowing how to dress, a man should master a couple of go-to recipes. We’re preparing one for each meal of the day: breakfast, lunch, dinner and dessert—and styling Blake in the process. The recipes will be constrained by situation (e.g. lunch while working from home), budget (e.g. $5, or maybe what you’ve got in the fridge) and time (e.g. you’ve got 10 minutes to throw an elegant breakfast together before heading to work.)
First, we did breakfast. Now: Lunch.

On Blake in the home office: Oxford shirt purchased in Buenos Aires for 75 pesos (joke’s on them, because that’s $25 US) by Felix; belt by Cause and Effect; khaki chinos ($20 sale) by Levi’s; mocassins by Quoddy.

You’re a hard worker. Unfortunately for you, that means you don’t always give lunch its due. That, or you order something “fast” a little too often, a one-way track to needing bigger pants in a couple of years.

We get it; it’s tempting. You’ve got a good workflow going, and no time to waste on a leisurely lunch out of the office. But you need a bit of fuel to be doing your best work. But in the interests of adequate fuel (and your waistband) you should really think about whipping up something at home.

Here, then, is a dish that’s quick to prepare and easy on the pocketbook. This is one that will take a slight amount of foresight—which is fine, because a man should know how to plan ahead.


A few thoughts from Blake about his lunch philosophy:

I’ve worked enough days in my life, from my desk at home to mind-numbing office temp gigs, to have developed some theories on lunch. To me, the working lunch is a series of balances: it should be fast, yet not fast-food; it should be a break from work, but not so indulgent you can’t get moving again; it should be fulfilling, but not a cause of sluggishness. Lunch should work for you, but so often it’s the other way around.

Here’s the idea: Work ahead, do a little bit of planning, and go vegetarian. And above all keep in mind: Healthy doesn’t have to mean it tastes like cardboard.

Start with a hearty grain, ideally with a high protein content—like farro, brown rice, or quinoa—and pair it with a vegetable, a touch of olive oil for slickness, and some kind of dressing. Sometimes just lemon juice works. Other times I rely on my stash of homemade vinaigrette that keeps for weeks in the fridge (speaking of, you should never buy salad dressing again after learning that recipe). But I’m most proud of my secret two-punch you see here: soft goat cheese and homemade pesto. It will blow your mind.

A few tips that make this a breeze:
  • Cook all the grain at once on Sunday, and stock up your fridge with a bunch of vegetables for the week. This recipe uses zucchini, but anything will work. Whatever you choose, it can be sauteed or roasted with salt, pepper, and garlic.
  • Make tons of pesto ahead of time and freeze it in ice cube trays. It’ll keep for at least a few months and be on hand whenever you need to whip it out (for tossing with hot pasta, for stirring into a soup, or spreading on some toast for a snack).
  • Have goat cheese in the fridge. It stays fresh for a while.

Delicious, nutritious lunch is never more than ten minutes away. Now get back to work.

Farro with Pesto and Goat Cheese
  • 1/4 pound farro
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 2 zucchini
  • 1 ounce fresh goat cheese, crumbled
  • 3 tablespoons pesto (recipe follows)
Cost: $2.15
Makes: One serving
Prep time: 10 minutes (plus 30 minutes or so the Sunday before)
  1. In a pot large enough to comfortably hold it, cover the farro (or other grain) with cold water. Bring to a boil and season the water with salt; it should be pleasantly briny but not overly salty. Cook until tender but still chewy, 20-30 minutes. Drain well.
  2. While the farro is cooking, halve the zucchini lengthwise and use a spoon to scrape out the seeds. Cut into half-moons.
  3. Heat the olive oil in a medium skillet until it shimmers. Add the zucchini pieces and garlic and sauté, stirring often, until the garlic is golden and the zucchini is tender but not mushy, 3-5 minutes.
  4. In a bowl, combine the hot farro, pesto, half the goat cheese, and the zucchini. Toss to combine—the heat of the farro should gently melt the goat cheese. Top with the remaining goat cheese and eat.

Homemade Pesto

1 clove garlic

1/4 teaspoon salt

A heaping handful of fresh basil

Olive oil as needed

2 tablespoons pine nuts

1/4 cup grated hard cheese (such as Parmesan or Pecorino)

Combine one of the garlic cloves with the salt in a mortar and pestle. Mash the garlic into a paste with the salt. Roughly chop the basil leaves and add them to the mixture, pounding them into a smooth-ish paste, then pound in the olive oil a little at a time to bring everything together into a sauce. Continue with the pine nuts and cheese and pound until smooth. Taste and season with salt, if needed.


NOTES ON PESTO: Alternatively, you could do this whole process in a small food processor, or quadruple the recipe and do it in a blender. But if you do that much (which we recommend), leave out the pine nuts and cheese before freezing in small quantities. When the time comes, defrost and mix in the cheese and pine nuts fresh.