midweSTYLE: Desert tones

Lately, I’ve been into this website called, “The Color Collective.” I’ve been reading this blog for a little over a year. It’s a huge source of inspiration in my presentation. Essentially, it’s a simple blog with various runway images, fashion photography, illustrations and landscapes all neatly complemented with highlighted colors from the image.
I usually like what I wear to reflect a mood, a theme, a story, a tone. The Color Collective picks those ideas out and translates them to workable color stories. Give it a try. I did with this post. Granted, most of the images are of women, but let’s get over that and source their inspiration, shall we?

From behind, it’s a field jacket, grey jeans and desert boots. From the front, it’s a scoop-neck, slub-knit tee and a draping open cardigan. A neat contrast from different angles. This is another one of my go-to outfits for this fall. It’s relaxed but not boring.

My thrifted, dirty canvas and leather backpack has come a long way from undergrad, especially for being such a great three dollar find my sophomore year in Kansas City. It’s a very understated, cool backpack: nothing fancy, minimal padding, no laptop sleeve. It’s like a broken in baseball glove after a couple of seasons. Trusty and well-loved.
Also, swap out your laces on your desert boots. It’s refreshing.
Second also, can we talk about grey denim? It’s the best.

Finally pulled the trigger on this puppy, the Giles & Brother brass railroad spike bracelet. I hate the word “man jewelry,” so I’m just going to pretend that we’re all secure enough in our own genders that we don’t need to put an extra adjective in front to assert that, cool? Haha. It’s “men’s jewelry” if anything, not man jewelry. I’ll step off my soap box, now. HAPPY MONDAY!

On Jeff: Cotton hunting jacket by Levi’s; unixex silk/rayon blend scoop-neck tee by T by Alexander Wang; slate-colored cardigan; grey straight-leg “Kane” 5-pocket pant courtesy J Brand; brown desert boots by Clark’s; grey interchangeable boot laces from J.Crew; brass railroad spike bracelet by Giles & Brother.

Photos by Seth Putnam.

stetson5 - is this the giles & bro skinny or normal railroad cuff?

lampshaj - Looks great. What would you guys consider the most versatile color for the desert boot? Thanks

Amy Creyer - Oh hai thar. That’s my favorite alley to shoot street style in, you’ll see that background in a lot of my shots :)

Color Collective - um, WOW this is awesome!!! love the outfit and the colors! thanks so much for the mention, how flattering! :)

Azalea - Love the warm, fall colors.

Friday Wrap-Up: Homecoming Edition

Despite our trickery in the past, we will really be tearing things up here this weekend. Bonus. So, in honor of Mizzou’s 100th Homecoming this weekend (and hence the 100th Homecoming ever, since, you know, Mizzou invented it), a photo from our archives:

Enjoy your weekend. We know we will.

Around the interwebz:

  • The folks over at Fossil created a rad graphic and featured us on their blog. (Fossil)
  • Ryan shoots a little mixer at Connect featuring Outlier. [You_Have_Broken_The_Internet]
  • It’s cooling down. We definitely want to throw this on our mattresses on the floor beds. (Pendleton)
  • Great new winter gear over at Need Supply, Wharf, Apolis and Steven Alan.
  • Put This On gives their weekly eBay round-up. Stock up on some well-loved gear that needs a good home! (Put This On)
  • Really nice belts for a really nice price. (Well-Spent)
  • What’s neater than toddlers and selvedge denim? Toddlers in selvedge denim. (Baldwin Denim)

Raquel - perfect collegiate apparel guys. Hope you had fun at homecoming!

Blake - Congrats on the shout-out by Fossil, guys! Much deserved.

http://21stcenturygent.blogspot.com/

THE REPERTOIRE: Working Lunch

This is the second installment of the “tiny cookbook” Blake Royer (from The Paupered Chef) is producing for us. If you’re just joining us: The idea was born over drinks at a tucked-away Chicago bar with the idea that, in addition to knowing how to dress, a man should master a couple of go-to recipes. We’re preparing one for each meal of the day: breakfast, lunch, dinner and dessert—and styling Blake in the process. The recipes will be constrained by situation (e.g. lunch while working from home), budget (e.g. $5, or maybe what you’ve got in the fridge) and time (e.g. you’ve got 10 minutes to throw an elegant breakfast together before heading to work.)
First, we did breakfast. Now: Lunch.

On Blake in the home office: Oxford shirt purchased in Buenos Aires for 75 pesos (joke’s on them, because that’s $25 US) by Felix; belt by Cause and Effect; khaki chinos ($20 sale) by Levi’s; mocassins by Quoddy.

You’re a hard worker. Unfortunately for you, that means you don’t always give lunch its due. That, or you order something “fast” a little too often, a one-way track to needing bigger pants in a couple of years.

We get it; it’s tempting. You’ve got a good workflow going, and no time to waste on a leisurely lunch out of the office. But you need a bit of fuel to be doing your best work. But in the interests of adequate fuel (and your waistband) you should really think about whipping up something at home.

Here, then, is a dish that’s quick to prepare and easy on the pocketbook. This is one that will take a slight amount of foresight—which is fine, because a man should know how to plan ahead.


A few thoughts from Blake about his lunch philosophy:

I’ve worked enough days in my life, from my desk at home to mind-numbing office temp gigs, to have developed some theories on lunch. To me, the working lunch is a series of balances: it should be fast, yet not fast-food; it should be a break from work, but not so indulgent you can’t get moving again; it should be fulfilling, but not a cause of sluggishness. Lunch should work for you, but so often it’s the other way around.

Here’s the idea: Work ahead, do a little bit of planning, and go vegetarian. And above all keep in mind: Healthy doesn’t have to mean it tastes like cardboard.

Start with a hearty grain, ideally with a high protein content—like farro, brown rice, or quinoa—and pair it with a vegetable, a touch of olive oil for slickness, and some kind of dressing. Sometimes just lemon juice works. Other times I rely on my stash of homemade vinaigrette that keeps for weeks in the fridge (speaking of, you should never buy salad dressing again after learning that recipe). But I’m most proud of my secret two-punch you see here: soft goat cheese and homemade pesto. It will blow your mind.

A few tips that make this a breeze:
  • Cook all the grain at once on Sunday, and stock up your fridge with a bunch of vegetables for the week. This recipe uses zucchini, but anything will work. Whatever you choose, it can be sauteed or roasted with salt, pepper, and garlic.
  • Make tons of pesto ahead of time and freeze it in ice cube trays. It’ll keep for at least a few months and be on hand whenever you need to whip it out (for tossing with hot pasta, for stirring into a soup, or spreading on some toast for a snack).
  • Have goat cheese in the fridge. It stays fresh for a while.

Delicious, nutritious lunch is never more than ten minutes away. Now get back to work.

Farro with Pesto and Goat Cheese
  • 1/4 pound farro
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, peeled and roughly chopped
  • 2 zucchini
  • 1 ounce fresh goat cheese, crumbled
  • 3 tablespoons pesto (recipe follows)
Cost: $2.15
Makes: One serving
Prep time: 10 minutes (plus 30 minutes or so the Sunday before)
  1. In a pot large enough to comfortably hold it, cover the farro (or other grain) with cold water. Bring to a boil and season the water with salt; it should be pleasantly briny but not overly salty. Cook until tender but still chewy, 20-30 minutes. Drain well.
  2. While the farro is cooking, halve the zucchini lengthwise and use a spoon to scrape out the seeds. Cut into half-moons.
  3. Heat the olive oil in a medium skillet until it shimmers. Add the zucchini pieces and garlic and sauté, stirring often, until the garlic is golden and the zucchini is tender but not mushy, 3-5 minutes.
  4. In a bowl, combine the hot farro, pesto, half the goat cheese, and the zucchini. Toss to combine—the heat of the farro should gently melt the goat cheese. Top with the remaining goat cheese and eat.

Homemade Pesto

1 clove garlic

1/4 teaspoon salt

A heaping handful of fresh basil

Olive oil as needed

2 tablespoons pine nuts

1/4 cup grated hard cheese (such as Parmesan or Pecorino)

Combine one of the garlic cloves with the salt in a mortar and pestle. Mash the garlic into a paste with the salt. Roughly chop the basil leaves and add them to the mixture, pounding them into a smooth-ish paste, then pound in the olive oil a little at a time to bring everything together into a sauce. Continue with the pine nuts and cheese and pound until smooth. Taste and season with salt, if needed.


NOTES ON PESTO: Alternatively, you could do this whole process in a small food processor, or quadruple the recipe and do it in a blender. But if you do that much (which we recommend), leave out the pine nuts and cheese before freezing in small quantities. When the time comes, defrost and mix in the cheese and pine nuts fresh.

midweSTYLE: Play ball!

Some have their “uniform.” You know, the usual. The chinos and button down. The suit and tie. The green apron and black polo. The scrubs. The chef pants and clean white tee. You get the picture. Work or play, some of us just have a “usual.”

Photography by the beautiful Carolina Rodriguez

These well-loved selvedge jeans and navy gingham are going to be my fall uniform. It’s what you’ll see me trotting around Wicker Park in on a Sunday afternoon after brunch. It’s what you’ll see me wearing as I run/stumble to catch a cab in Lincoln Park. It’s what you’ll see me throw on when I roll outta bed with 30 minutes ’til I need to be at work. It’s that, it’s my go-to, the usual, the uniform.


THE VARSITY JACKET: It’s one of my favorite thrifted finds of all time. It’s so hard to find a naked varsity jacket. Makes you wonder who had it before and why they wimped out to never letter. Speaking of wimps, guess who lettered in varsity athletics in high school? This guy did. Swimming and track and field. Psh, you think I would actually play football? What other sport would a tall skinny white boy excel in who avoided any sort of physical contact? Except the occasional hurdle.

THE “KC” HAT: The navy blue with white felt lettering “KC” hat was the perfect gift one of my coworkers from Kansas City could give me upon departing for the big Windy City. I’m still amazed by the compliments I get and the acquaintances I’ve met while walking around the city with this cap on. Fitted and in a traditional cut. I love this hat. You can meet Daniel, Matt and David by picking it up at the Baldwin Denim Men’s Store in KC or order one online if you don’t have the time to visit.

THE “SEVEN” NAVY GINGHAM SHIRT: A button-down with sleeves long enough for my lanky arms? You’ve got my attention, folks. I’m looking forward to carrying this winter-weight gingham into fall considering most of my ginghams are summer-weight. You can’t beat a good navy check shirt; it’s practically a neutral. The fit is comfortable as well, not too snug and not too relaxed, even for a toothpick like me. You can snatch one up at Wharf in blue or a variety of colors.

Also, Happy Anniversary to my Baldwin “Henley’s.” One year with no wash and one crotch repair. This is a menswear right of passage into adultswaghood, folks.

What’s your fall uniform? Chambray, chinos, desert boots, tweed jacket, etc. Let us know.

On Jeff: The Henley11.5 oz raw selvedge denim by Baldwin Denim ($200); The “Seven” navy gingham button-down ($148) courtesy of WHARF; the “KC” hat by Baldwin Denim ($42); “Spectator LX” in Moon Beam courtesy of Vans x The Brothers Marshall ($85); thrifted wool blue and white varsity jacket with leather insets by Butwin from Wild Man Vintage ($12); brass railroad spike cuff by Giles & Brother ($55).

Photography by the talented Carolina Rodriguez.

Bill - I’ve been going back through almost all of the posts and this is one of my favorites. I’m really digging the varsity jacket (and the entire ensemble).

LRice - loving ya’lls blog – original and impressive, I stumbled into it through Fossil’s feature keep up the good work!

HOLLA! - did you do the crotch repair yourself or have a tailor do it? that is always wear my jeans get a hole first, so i’m very curious to know how to repair it! thanks!

brian

Miguel Ignacio - Varsity Jackets are cool, but they have to fit perfectly otherwise you can take the risk to look like a hanger.

I´ve always thought that kind of jackets is for big guys, but not anymore! they can make a slim guy look nice in that particular “eighties update” look.

Im not into uniform, but I can say that my favorite outfit for fall weather is jeans, brown leather jacket, one color t-shirt and of course a scarf that match (this season with big squares!)… keep it simple.

Cheers!

IndiaMorgan - Carolina’s photos are gorgeous – so much more interesting than the standard fashion blog shots you see. Love the shots of the clothes thrown up in the trees. SHOOT MORE FOR THESE BOYS, GIRL.

Also – jeans not washed for a whole year? That’s mad real, I’m into it.

Lora - I love this. While varsity jackets were all over the runways during NYFW, I much prefer the classic, back-to-school styling you’ve done here. Thanks for posting the details, my husband is going to look great in this shirt!

http://www.madamdonut.blogspot.com

Raquel - The varsity jacket is perfect. I love how those are coming back in style.

Chris - For starters, I’ve been following you guys for a while, and I love what you do.

I’m a huge fan of the Baldwin cap, as I have one with red on navy: http://freshlysquozenstyle.tumblr.com/post/11284748855/baldwin-warby-parker-handyman

My autumn calls for mocha cords, baseball tee, and chukkas, for sure.

Keep it up, fellas, your site is awesome!

Friday Wrap-Up: Oct. 7

Is it Friday already? Guess that means we’ll be living it up here this weekend. Hope you see you there.
In the meantime, in between reading poignant profiles of Steve Jobs, here are just a few style-related stories you should check out:
  • “No one really thought about why glasses were so expensive.” The founders of Warby Parker explain how they subverted the eyewear industry and brought us spectacles that don’t break the bank. (via Racked via Time)
  • Rugby brings the Tweed Run to New York City. Get thee to the streets. (via Marion Brewer)
  • And the funniest thing you’ll read today: Chelsea Fagan for Thought Catalog on what the hell is going on with street-style photography. (via Marion Brewer)
That’s all. What? You’re still here? Go. Go on.

glen - The Fagan article is really funny. I have thought about commenting on some of those things (not on this blog, of course. You guys are wonderful).

Things I would add to it:

-Why does nobody ever look at the camera? Are we supposed to believe that you were so focused on candidly twirling that umbrella while simultaneously doing the hula hoop that you neglected to notice the person taking pictures of you? You really don’t see the camera that is so obviously right in front of you? And you can’t break a smile for it? Not just a little one? Oh, of course not, because you have no idea you are being photographed.

and

-How do so many fashion photographers have jobs when they clearly struggle with getting an entire person in one frame. (To steal a line from Fagan) If I had a dollar for every fashion picture I saw that didn’t have somebody’s head cut out of it, I would have, like, three dollars max.