Woodland: Barbour & burrs

I love outwear pieces. They are some of my favorite to own, collect and swap. It’s what you’re throwing on over your cardigan, bundling up in when winter hits and anxiously waiting to wrap around your shoulders before you dash into the freshly fallen snow. It’s also what most people see in when you bump into one another on the street all decked out to not freeze your ass off. So it doesn’t hurt to own a few different options:
  • If it’s below 20, I’m wearing my down puffy coat and everything that traps heat.
  • If it’s around the 30s, I’m wearing my Barbour Bedale + Patagonia down sweater combo. 
  • It it’s around 40s, I’m wearing my Barbour Liddesdale + blazer. 
  • If it’s around 50s, I’m wearing a tank top.
It’s a wise choice to invest in a nice coat (or two) (or five). I’ve thrifted a handful that I’m pretty stoked about. But you also have to remain open to throwing down the dough for a couple of lifelong pieces. It’s outwear. You wear it a lot. That’s okay. And it’s better than freezing in a thin piece of cotton veiled as a jacket. I’m looking at you, Nathan.


When I was interviewing Jobs in Chicago in March 2011, I thought: “I don’t need a coat.” Seth watched, cackling, as I got off the El and made a fast break for the Patagonia* store to buy a red down sweater jacket. This has been such a staple in layering, traveling and everyday use. It’s windproof, lightweight, packable, and it regulates your body temp so you’re not boiling. When I trekked to Europe a few weeks ago, I knew I was taking this get-up: Patagonia down sweater and my Barbour. Both can be folded up into a tote and stowed upon entering a building, and when used together, they’re an unstoppable combination for winter. 

I also dig these new trousers I picked up from Barney’s this winter by Gant Rugger. Great slim fit, medium rise and trouser pockets. I’m a sucker for those. Also, they are hella long for these lanky legs of mine.

On Jeff: Waxed “Bedale” coat with copper wire hood attachment by Barbour; red down sweater by Patagonia; thrifted red plaid shirt; slim fit grey trousers by Gant Rugger; trusty brown suede “8878″ boots by Red Wing; black framed eyeglasses by Gant Rugger; burgundy beanie from Target; natural leather belt from Urban Outfitters.

*One of my favorite outdoor performance gear brands is Patagonia. As a certified one-time YoungLifer, I’m an expert in outdoor performance gear and have a collection that would make you think I’m outdoorsy. However, dear readers, it’s merely a facade. I like the idea of camping, pooping in the woods and not showering than the actual act of camping, but I’ve got a sufficient amount of equipment that would permit an impromptu weekend getaway. Plus, it’s not like I need to go camping to avoid  maintaining general hygiene practices.

Chang - perfection.

PERKS: Your Night At Nellcôte

UPDATES, Y’ALL:

Here are the winners, you lucky dogs:
Really wish we had more to go around…but keep at it. The giveaways are a-plenty around here.

Readers, oh readers.
We’ve got some intel for you, but we have to be quick about it. Here’s the downlow: There’s a major new restaurant opening Chicago. It’s called Nellcôte, and it’s based on the French villa of the same name that the Rolling Stones leased for a summer in 1971. They recorded “Exile on Main St.” in the basement. 
The idea behind this restaurant has got some heft: On a nightly basis they intend to recreate the infamous house party the Stones threw for “a veritable checklist of rock ‘n’ royalty including artists, style icons, deviants, socialites and creative misfits.”
If you haven’t heard about this operation already, you will soon. 

The thing is, it’s not open yet. We can get you in. Word has it, Jared Van Camp and the boys are throwing a special preview on Tuesday. Here’s what we know:
Evening of Exile
Special Nellcôte Preview
833 W. Randloph St.
Chicago, IL 60607
Fare: Trays from the executive menu. Cocktails. Wine.
Date: Tuesday, February 28
Time: 6 – 8 p.m.
All you have to do is scuba dive up the Chicago River, find a way through the underwater tunnels, unzip your wet suit, brush off the tux you had on the whole time, and enjoy the party. Alright, alright it’s way simpler than that. 
We’ve got a total of eight (8) tickets, and we’d love it if you’d come party with us.

 You can get ‘em by following us on Twitter and liking us on Facebook. Then do one of the following:

The lucky ones will be chosen at random. This is open to everyone. But please, only throw your hat in the ring if you will be in Chicago on Feb. 28. That’s Tuesday.

Hop to it! And for heavens’ sake, dress nice.
Photos courtesy of Potluck Creative.

James - Would be great to attend – appreciate the opportunity.

Lindsey - Followed and liked. Crossing my fingers…

Elliott - Let’s Rip This Joint.

Tugboat - Definitely down!

Jacob M - Sounds amazing! I’d love to go.

Ethan - Jeff an co!

This is all me!

ebernal13 - Done and done!

Jean - Unbelievably excited for this place to open.

LVH - Pick meeeeeee

johari - i’d love to attend, please randomly pick me.

SingingReporter - Yess please and thank you!

Unknown - Yes! I’d love to attend!

Aaron - Looks fancy, I’m in.

stylechild - looking forward to checking out more of your blog and partying with you at Nellcote!

Brennan - Let’s do this.

tuchler814 - on it! i’ll be going either way but would love to go on the soon side!

The Put-Man - Done, and done!

Friday Wrap-Up: Gary Cooper and Missouri’s True/False Film Festival


Here’s some general miscellany and packaged goods we thought you should know about:


On Gary Cooper:

  • “Believe me, he was the best looking son of a bitch that ever lived.” If there’s one thing we love, it’s the impossible style of movies stars from the middle of the 20th century. And if those words (Bill Blass’s, by the way) doesn’t describe Gary Cooper, we don’t know what does. To see the rest of the quote, check out Cary Randolph Fuller’s feature on Cooper, which appeared on the cover of Ralph Lauren Magazine’s spring issue.

On lying:

  • If you don’t know about the True/False Film Festival, you should. I’m almost not sure how to even describe it, but it’s the best documentary film festival in the world, and it’s here in the Midwest. If you think sitting in a dark room with hundreds of other people for 72+ hours doesn’t sound like fun, you’re wrong. The entire town comes alive, and there are secret parties and mind-blowing new ways of looking at the world. Missouri? Who would have thought? We’ll have full coverage in a few weeks.
  • It’s happening March 1–4 in Columbia, Mo. Unless you act, like, now, you may already be out of time.

On sale:

On hard-ons:
  • Our thrifting find of the week: topical Chicago Cubs humor. Wrigleyville? Sounds about right.

Midwestory Man - Some clothes look like they are better “suited” for igloos.

Lisa Love - love you dudes.

Daniel Honigman - Man, that Harden shirt’s pretty bad, but the Fukudome shirts were even funnier.

Roxy - I’ve been reading you blog for a while now, and while I’m a female, I definitely appreciate the style on here. I’m orginally from Chicagoland, but I’m finishing up at Mizzou, and let me tell you, it’s really cool to read a blog that knows both Chicagoland and CoMO!

OBSESSION: The FJ40

I am not, by any means, an autophile. I don’t have subscriptions to Car and Driver or Motor Trend. I drive a Dodge Stratus (that’s not just a quote, it’s what I actually drive). As the youngest in my family, I grew up driving a ’97 Chrysler Plymouth minivan, relegated to me after my mother’s years of to-ing and fro-ing with her three kids had at last come to a close. When that finally (finally!) breathed its last breath, we went out and splurged on a… Ford Windstar. That’s also a minivan, for those who don’t know. I understand that I was incredibly blessed to even have a car, don’t get me wrong, I’m just saying that what I was driving was never really a high priority. So, when people always asked me what car I wanted to drive when I reached full-fledged adulthood and got a real job, I never had an answer. I did, rather. It was, “I don’t really care.” For the last 18-20 years of my life, I have lived in apathy toward the automobile industry, waiting for a make and model that would, you know, really spark my interest or something.

My obsession with FJ40′s stemmed from a broad interest in land cruisers and early model SUV’s in general. That began during the season three finale of Lost. If you haven’t seen it, I won’t spoil it. But, at one point, Jack Shepherd is shown driving an International Harvester Scout, one of the few founding fathers of the civilian-minded, off-road, sport utility vehicle industry. For maybe the first time I thought, “Damn, it would be really awesome to drive that.” From there, sixties and seventies off-road cruisers have been like a weird drug to me. The aesthetic king of this niche though, in my opinion, is the Toyota FJ40.
This particular vehicle is a build by ICON, a Los Angeles based company who specializes in pairing the high performance with classic aesthetics. You can read more about ICON on their website, or check out Michael’s recent trip to their showroom. You can lust after this 2006 build here.

At least now I definitely have an answer to the old question, “What do you want to drive when you grow up?” Also, one of my roommates, on top of being a great dude, is an incredibly talented mechanic who is quick to help out his friends with their automotive needs. So, when I started gushing to him about buying up an old model cruiser and doing a restoration, he made the ordeal sound like an all-too-achievable possibility. After working as a mechanic under his dad for years and then as he branched out from there, he assured me he has the skills and the contacts to keep the price at a minimum. The thought makes my heart pound. Look out for that… in a few years. A man can dream, right?

#eyecandy
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